Mental Health and Football

We all know that men tend to find opening up and talking honestly difficult. Footballers, and all sportsmen, are likely to be even more wary than most, (a mental health problem being likely to be seen as “weakness” in your average football dressing-room).

 

I’m delighted that my favourite charity, Mind, has teamed up with the English Football League, in an attempt at promoting honesty and openness and ending the stigma surrounding mental health issues in sport:¬†https://www.mind.org.uk/news-campaigns/campaigns/efl-partnership/

 

Great, too, that my team, Sheffield Wednesday, has such an honest character as Sam Hutchinson in its ranks. He received an award from BBC Radio Sheffield, for a talk he gave on his own mental ill health, and the things and people that have helped him to cope better with his problems: https://www.swfc.co.uk/news/2019/december/hutchinson-receives-radio-award/

 

Sam is loved by the fans at Hillsborough for his wholehearted approach to the game – and to life more generally. Can I call him a “ledge”..? Well, I just have.

MIND, Manchester

Mental health charity, Manchester Mind, is 30 years old this year. Originally called Hulme Action Resource Project (HARP) the organisation was set up to help improve the mental health of people living in perhaps Europe’s worst housing (Crescents of Hulme).

 

I moved to Manchester in the mid 90s and used to pass the abandoned Hulme Crescents on the bus into town. They were finally demolished in 1994/95. I worked as a volunteer for “Mind-in-Manchester” a little later. Some of the most rewarding work of my life. (I’ve also borrowed their tagline for my blog…)

 

30 years old, still going strong: https://manchestermind.org/about-us/