Go That Extra Mile

Gretchen Reynolds (New York Times) writes about the science behind the links between physical exercise and good mental health. Not just weight-lifting, fell-running or five-a-side football, any physical exercise can help.

For instance, older women who regularly stroll for two miles per day (4000 steps) live longer than those who stroll just one mile or less. Even regularly rising from the chair, at home or in the office, seems to make people happier.

Find the article on The Independent’s consistently high-quality site:https://www.independent.co.uk/health_and_wellbeing/exercise-trends-2019-mental-health-ageing-walking-running-a9268926.html

Exercise Your Mental Health

running-alone

 

Incorporating regular exercise into your weekly routine is a great way to reduce stress, stave off depression and generally look and feel more healthy. It is also a way in which you can be alone, if this is important to you.

Running is perfect for me, because it is so simple and requires so little equipment (a pair of trainers, a t-shirt and some shorts). It also legitimizes me being alone, for an hour or so. Something essential for my mental health.

You may not need regular and frequent time alone but if you are mildly depressed or anxious, or suffering from any form of stress, I recommend that you get running, swimming or cycling. Yoga is also a fantastic form of exercise – for body, mind and spirit.

The more scientifically minded should check out the NHS website: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/pages/exercise-for-depression.aspx. Here, a GP recommends exercise for better mental health.